Too neurotic for my own good...

I’m going to try and darken this image but in the meantime I wanted to share what is probably my all-time favorite panel from the WJHC series by Jane Fisher. This scene represents the climax of the story “Notes Afloat”, with chaos erupting just as a writer and photographer from a well-known magazine show up to write an article on the high school’s recently re-built radio station.
This was the last full issue I illustrated and I feel it was my best work of the series. I really love the gag in the upper right hand corner, of the ‘giant’ character yelling at another. Jane Fisher gave me a lot of freedom to add gags that were not in the script and that was one. Is it wrong to find yourself funny?
Here’s a little WJHC factoid: the photographer, seen in the lower left hand corner lifting his camera onto his shoulder, is based on Luke Wilson’s character in The Royal Tenenbaum’s after he shaves his head.

I’m going to try and darken this image but in the meantime I wanted to share what is probably my all-time favorite panel from the WJHC series by Jane Fisher. This scene represents the climax of the story “Notes Afloat”, with chaos erupting just as a writer and photographer from a well-known magazine show up to write an article on the high school’s recently re-built radio station.

This was the last full issue I illustrated and I feel it was my best work of the series. I really love the gag in the upper right hand corner, of the ‘giant’ character yelling at another. Jane Fisher gave me a lot of freedom to add gags that were not in the script and that was one. Is it wrong to find yourself funny?

Here’s a little WJHC factoid: the photographer, seen in the lower left hand corner lifting his camera onto his shoulder, is based on Luke Wilson’s character in The Royal Tenenbaum’s after he shaves his head.

laylainalaska:

fuckyeahsources:

Nope. But the real story is better. Bolding mine:

The late Ruth Thompson, a cell painter on “Snow White” who later became a multiplane scene planner, recalled: “We tried everything - airbrush, drybrush, even lipstick and rouge, which is perhaps the basis for the legend because we did, in fact, try it. But nothing worked.

The airbrush was difficult to control on such a small area; drybrush was too harsh; lipstick and rouge unwieldy and messy. Everything proved to be impractical and all hope seemed lost to give Snow White her little bit of color when the idea of using a dye was proposed.

Again Ms. Thompson: “Someone suggested a red dye because the blue day we added to give Donald Duck his distinctive sailor-blue never really could be washed off the cell without leaving a bluish stain where the paint had been applied.”

Ever since the mid 30’s when color became the norm for all the cartoons, not just the “Silly Symphonies,” all paints and inks were made at the studio. During this period as well cells were routinely reused for economic reasons, thus the need to wash them off. Apparently Donald’s special blue color was made with a dye added to the usual powdered pigments. “So we tried that.” As the women gathered around in what must have seemed just another dead-end effort, all eyes became fixed on the red dot which soon became a small glow with no perceptible edge. The hushed silence soon gave way to sighs of relief. The method had finally been found. Now the application.

Among the studio’s many inkers (an extremely demanding profession), was one young lady whose training and skill was unique: Helen Ogger. Just being an inker placed one within the elite confines of this most “holy of holies” area of the Nunnery, as the Ink and Paint Department was so called (Walt had strict and quite Victorian views that the sexes not mingle at the workplace, allowing no male personnel save the “gofer” boy and the paymaster “Mr.” Keener to enter this domain of mostly unmarried women ). But Helen was in addition a very fine cartoonist and one of the few women at Disney’s or anywhere else, who could animate.

Such a seemingly insignificant detail (as the cheek colors) might be thought not worthy of special mention (she, as well as the other inkers and painters, was given no screen credit). But when one adds up the number of footage required to be tinted freehand on each individual cell, the hours suddenly turn into weeks and months. In fact, such a treatment was never attempted again on such a scale and even today, the publicity stills from “Snow White,” most of which do not have the added blush, bear witness to how that little touch of extra care adds to the vitality we see on the screen.

The work was done on all close-ups, most medium shots, and even on some long shots. The Queen was also similarly tinted. Hundreds of hours were needed to complete this task, arduous, repetitive and, of course, hard on the eyes. Ultimately a handful of other girls were needed to assist Helen as the clocked ticked toward the deadline.

Helen had to place several cells together on an animation board, one atop the other, just like in the process of animation, in order to get the ‘registration’ right (the spot of red just right in relation to the preceding and following ones) - all of this without any guide. She would work out her own extremes and then ‘animate’ the blush in inbetweens. Her work deserves admiration and gratitude and it is unfortunate that her contribution has remained unknown and her anonymity unaltered during her lifetime. She was paid, as were the rest of the Inkers, $18 a week, which included a half-day on Saturday and the many, many hours of unpaid overtime “Snow White” would require - all given unstintingly, (by everyone involved, it should be added), to a project whose joy in participating was its own reward.

She eventually became head of Inking and Special Effects and even taught classes in animation at the studio. She left in 1941 (apparently part of the terrible strike that would leave the Disney Studio changed forever), taking her skills with her. She died in Glendale in February of 1980. Perhaps it is safe to say that her departure was critical to the abrupt demise of this now unique effect (it was also used, though on a much smaller scale in both “Pinocchio” and “Fantasia”). None of the other inkers or painters were animators and it is this fact, not just the factor of economy nor the changing tastes, which surely must be considered a reason why such details were never attempted again. The golden age was over.

Also, here’s an interesting article about female cel painters at Disney. I am now fascinated by the idea of writing something with a Depression-era cel painter as a protagonist.

(Source: timblanks)

I cannot leave well enough alone. I decided to tweak my Loki drawing. The coloring of the Midgard serpent was bothering me so i decided to make it uniform with the border. I also took out the ‘galaxy’ in the background and turned the rocks blue.

The bottom drawing is the original.

I think the top drawing looks cleaner and little more reflective of the art nouveau influence.

peachberrylove:

kill-dorothy:

I think this video might interest you guys.

4 days ago, Olivia Olson confirmed that Marceline and Bonnibel have dated before. The reason it has been confirmed is because the new Adventure Time book coming out soon may have details on their relationship, and their relationship obviously can’t be aired on TV because some states of America (and countries in the world) are against same-sex marriage and relationships. 

But yeah, they have indeed dated before.

Can we also talk about official Bubbline art drawn by Natasha Allgeri, former character designer and story board artist for Adventure Time, and now Showrunner of Bee and Puppy Cat!?

*internal screaming*

I look forward to the day when we can watch cartoons depicting same-sex relationships on national TV. That day will come. That day is coming…

(Source: lil-human-cal)

Concept art for the cover of WJHC’s “Tripwrecked.” Ultimately, it was not used because the kids actually travel by bus and it was thought that showing them on a ship did not make sense. Well, I liked the idea…

Concept art for the cover of WJHC’s “Tripwrecked.” Ultimately, it was not used because the kids actually travel by bus and it was thought that showing them on a ship did not make sense. Well, I liked the idea…

Another panel from “Note’s Afloat.”  I was always pleased with this page. My drawing style is fairly clean and simple but I always aimed to have a dynamic ‘camera’: switching frequently between wide, medium, and close-up shots. So even scenes without a lot of action, like this conversation between two lead characters, would still be interesting to look at.

Another panel from “Note’s Afloat.”  I was always pleased with this page. My drawing style is fairly clean and simple but I always aimed to have a dynamic ‘camera’: switching frequently between wide, medium, and close-up shots. So even scenes without a lot of action, like this conversation between two lead characters, would still be interesting to look at.

These two drawings represent the rough and clean versions of a panel from another WJHC story called “Notes Afloat”, in which an anonymous love letter gets passed around to the wrong people with hilarious results. I always did my rough drawings in small sketchbooks before committing the final product to Strathmore 400 series 11” x 14” paper. The ‘lines’ you’re seeing in the final drawings are from having to scan the artwork piecemeal in order to preserve it digitally.

I was once illustrator for a comic book series called “WJHC,” written by Jane Fisher. This is a panel from a short story called “Before the Bell.”

I was once illustrator for a comic book series called “WJHC,” written by Jane Fisher. This is a panel from a short story called “Before the Bell.”

I know I posted the finished artwork earlier, but I thought it might be nice to display it alongside the original rough drawing to see how it evolved during the clean up process…

I know I posted the finished artwork earlier, but I thought it might be nice to display it alongside the original rough drawing to see how it evolved during the clean up process…

I love the fantasy genre when it comes to art and literature and my drawings regularly reflect that…